Soul Inspiring Elopement Vows You Can Use by R. Clift Poetry

Meet my dear friend Rachel Clift. She’s the very essence of what it means to be a poet.

Rachel and I recently took a road trip to North Carolina to adventure in the mountains while sharing stories of our pasts and of our journeys to becoming the women we are today. She’s listened as I rambled endlessly about my beliefs, life experiences, pain, and love. She held space for emotions to expand, and I’ll forever be grateful for that.⁠ Because everything we have ever exchanged has been felt on a soul level, what you are about to read came as no surprise when I stumbled upon these well-crafted vows…

A month or so ago, she was attending a wedding when she felt the urge to rewrite the wedding vows during the reception. Here’s what she shared on her Instagram post: “When they said ‘until death do we part’ I realized that if and when I ever love someone that much— it will last so much longer than until death do we part.” When I read her revised edition of wedding vows, chills came over my entire body. This is what it means to love.

“To have an to hold,
I will take you, I will love you
beyond
until death do we part–
Hear this now, my vow,
for wherever my soul ends up–
in this world or the next,
I will love you long after
my bones turn to dust and all
I’ve ever known
has been consumed by oceans.
I will love you through
the burning of stars and every
stray galaxy and the vast, cold,
emptiness of space and even if
we are never to meet again– in all
our trillions of lifetimes– I will love you
even then. I will love you more.
When I say this bond, this connection, this
thread tying your soul to mine is infinite
and eternal I do not mean simply until you
you take your last breath or until
god destroys the earth– I mean
that I have loved you before the beginning
of time– when we were all only nebula & intention,
and I will love you long after we return
to the nothingness that we were created from.
Until the universe collapses in on itself–
and my love for you is all that remains.”


R. Clift

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